How To Listen To Music On Phone Without Using Data Understanding MIDI – MIDI Ports, Channels, and the General MIDI Standard

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Understanding MIDI – MIDI Ports, Channels, and the General MIDI Standard

In a previous article I wrote a basic definition of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) and how modern musicians can use it in their independent production. This time I will write about the technical aspects of MIDI, including available MIDI ports, MIDI networks and how to use them, and general MIDI standards that allow MIDI files to be read consistently on multiple MIDI capable devices (hardware And software).

MIDI port

As in any other audio or music technology, MIDI has input and output. To explain the use of these two ports, use the example of a MIDI keyboard and a computer (in which case a MIDI to USB converter is required for the computer). The MIDI OUT port on the keyboard is connected to the MIDI IN port on the computer. This means the keyboard transmits MIDI data for playback or recording inside the computer. Instead, the MIDI IN port on the keyboard can be connected to the computer’s MIDI OUT port, which allows the MIDI data recorded inside the computer to be sent back to the keyboard so that the keyboard can play back MIDI data (this This means you can record yourself playing MIDI data in the music app and then play it back on the keyboard and record audio from the keyboard for a better editing process).

In addition to MIDI IN and OUT, there are MIDI THRU ports that are sometimes available on MIDI devices. MIDI THRU function to transmit MIDI data received at MIDI IN port to other MIDI devices or devices. For example, the keyboard receives MIDI data from a computer in its MIDI IN port. If the keyboard has a MIDI THRU port, it can transfer the data it receives from the computer to the MIDI IN port of another MIDI device. It is useful to connect multiple MIDI devices that receive data from a single MIDI OUT port from a computer (for example, to play multiple strings using different cable sounds on different keyboards).

In the latest technology, the keyboard can be connected to a computer via a direct USB connection without the need for a USB to MIDI converter. The downside is that it limits your ability to connect multiple MIDI devices together.

MIDI channel

There are 16 MIDI Channels for each 1 MIDI port. That means any MIDI port can send and receive 16 channels of MIDI data. Each MIDI channel contains all the MIDI information related to a specific track. For example, if the first track is an Acoustic Piano, then MIDI Channel 1 will have notes, lengths, support notes, and other process data to be played back by the sound source. The playback sound is determined by the bank number and the patch inside the MIDI Channel. For example, using the common MIDI standard, the acoustic piano is always the # 1 patch, and the acoustic guitar (nylon) is always # 25. There are 128 patches in total.

Having 16 MIDI channels per port allows you to write songs using 16 different sections. For example, you could use Channel 1 for the Saxophone soundtrack (patch # 65 Soprano Sax), compose the piano part (Patch # 5 Electric Piano 1), and compose the rhythm part using the bass (Patch # 34 finger, electric bass). And drums (using MIDI Channel 10, a channel that is specifically intended to play percussion, regardless of the patch number you program). If you need more channels then you need more MIDI ports!

Common MIDI (or GM) standards

The GM standard is a standard used to be able to consistently play MIDI files between different MIDI devices. I mentioned above about Patch Numbers and MIDI Channels. These patch numbers are the type of sound to be played (# 1 for Acoustic Piano). In order for other devices to understand that MIDI Channel 1 is MIDI data for piano sound, it applies the GM standard and specifies that Patch # 1 is a piano sound (then it will be called a piano sound version, sometimes it may sound Better or it could be a simpler sound depending on the internal audio synthesizer used to play the MIDI data). Most keyboards and applications, when storing MIDI data, store it under the GM standard. I hope this article was helpful for you to learn more about modern digital music technology. To succeed your music.

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