Music Videos That Have Nothing To Do With The Song Guitar Players – Give Your "A" Chord the Finger

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Guitar Players – Give Your "A" Chord the Finger

Anyone who’s been in a band for any length of time is bound to be familiar with the squeals and screams of “Freebird” that begin to descend on the stage around the third or fourth set.

Having had this buzz for more years than I can count, it was interesting to see how many members of the band reacted when Arguably the most in-demand song in modern history, After Midnight , arrived.

More than once, I’ve been sitting in the back of the PA booth, facing the nearest exit, when someone in the band gets on the mike and yells, “I got your free bird!” was announced. This, of course, is accompanied by universally accepted gestures.

Of course, the title of this article has nothing to do with fingering your A chords like that – but we’re going to talk about giving your open A chords a “one-finger salute.”

Traditional guitar lessons and teaching methods tend to do what many educational programs do in almost any subject area – they make matters worse. Teaching beginning guitar students to play major chords in open position is a perfect example of this.

When I first picked up my guitar over thirty years ago, I still remember Alfred’s book 1 Guitar, where I knew where to put my fingers awkwardly. Early in the process I had to learn to play A major chords. There was a chord diagram in the book showing that the A chord in open position should be played with the following.

2nd finger on the 4th string, 2nd string.

3rd fret of the 2nd fret on the 3rd string.

And…

4th finger 2nd string 2nd string.

Over the years I have seen other lesson plans that teach students to use other fingering combinations for the A chord. Some say to use fingers 1, 2, and 3 in sequence. I saw that it is recommended to use the combination of 2 – 1 – 3 fingers (which seems very awkward to me).

One thing I’ve rarely seen is a guitar tutorial that shows students how to play the A chord most easily.

In our guitar lessons, we talk a lot about visualization and the “image” of chords. If you take a moment to imagine the A major chord shape in open position, you’ll see that the chord shape is a straight line along the second fret of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th strings.

As someone looking for the fastest, easiest, and most basic way to play things on guitar, it never made sense to me to strike three fingers in different combinations to play this chord. tricks!

Open major chords can be “barred” with the first finger on the 2nd fret of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th strings with very little effort. The hardest part of playing a chord this way is getting your fingers right so you don’t accidentally block the 5th string (A) and the 1st string (E).

This is done by playing the note from the fingertip to the first fret, and then bending the base fingertip at an angle so that the 1st (E) string is in a certain position.

Plus, there’s no reason to limit yourself to just playing open A chords with your first finger. Many times you will need to use your second or even third finger to play chords.

In fact, if you’re playing an “A” shaped barre chord, you’re using your third finger to play the “A” shape only in the high fret position. So why not play the A chord in open position using the one-finger method?

When using the one-finger chord technique, there are times when you can use a different finger to play a chord in the same chord sequence.

For example, when playing a common E – A – D – A chord progression, you can move from the E chord to the A chord by playing the A chord with your second finger. Then you can use your first finger to move from the D chord back to A.

This way, your hand will naturally fall into place every time you change chords, making transitions smoother and easier.

Using the three-finger method for the A chord makes more sense than the one-finger method. For example, when you walk from A to A7, you will need an extra finger to walk down.

But other than that, there’s no reason to work harder when playing the A chord.

So the next time you pick up your guitar, try “fingering” the A chord, regardless of what the books tell you. Once you get used to playing them this way, you’ll find it hard to imagine going back to the old, clumsy three-finger method!

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