The New Handbook Of Research On Music Teaching And Learning Sleep Issues for Visual-Spatial Kids

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Sleep Issues for Visual-Spatial Kids

When I was pregnant with my first child, someone gave me a card that I have never forgotten. It says, “Having a baby is nature telling you that you’ve slept too much!” In the thirteen years since then, there have been many nights where the children have had no problems getting ready for bed, peaceful sleep, uninterrupted sleep through the night, and longing to wake up as a family. ready for the day. Since studying the characteristics of visual and spatial learners who think pictorially rather than verbally, I wonder whether or not these children have more sleep problems than auditory and sequential children. Are your visual and spatial children having trouble sleeping at night? Are they “too wired” before bed? Maybe now that their left brain can take a break during the school day, their right brain is fully refreshed and ready to create something new or go on an imaginative adventure.

If your kids can’t sleep at night, I have some tips to help. First, your kids need to understand how important sleep is to their bodies and brains. They may think they are just getting along when they haven’t even slept at night. However, if they actually got the amount of sleep their bodies needed, they would do better in school, sports, music, and even better relationships with friends and family. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, there are no guidelines for how much sleep a person should get after childhood. However, if your children are sleepy or unable to concentrate in class, start with an earlier bedtime.

Sleep researchers study sleep, especially deep sleep

… allows the brain to monitor and integrate all the streams of information gathered while awake. Another (study) suggests that the brain sleeps to store fuel and remove waste. The third thing is that sleep works in mysterious ways to help you master different skills, like playing the piano or riding a bike. (Time, December 20, 2004, Why We Sleep by Christine Gorman, pp. 48-49)

Researchers have found that most mammals, including humans, alternate between REM (rapid eye movement) and non-REM sleep. During REM sleep, people experience increased brain activity and vivid dreams. REM sleep is very important for humans, but in order to achieve it, you need to go through the stages of non-REM sleep. In fact, “your ability to recognize certain patterns on a computer screen is directly related to the amount of REM sleep you have.” (Time, December 20, 2004, Christine Gorman, Why We Sleep, pp. 48-49) Also, learning something new before bedtime helps children remember that information better. Therefore, any important study for an exam should be done right before bed.

Have you ever woken up in the morning with a problem in your head only to get the answer? Because your brain keeps track of the day’s events, even when you’re unconscious. You can encourage your children to “sleep on” an issue before making an important decision. They might be surprised to find a solution overnight!

How do you get your children to sleep first if they understand the importance of sleep? Here are some tips to help your kids relax and get a good night’s sleep.

1. Adjust your body clock by following the same sleep schedule seven days a week. Don’t try to catch up with them by staying up late on the weekends.

2. Create an environment that helps your child sleep, not just keep them awake. A cool, dark, uncluttered room should help. Eye shadow or earplugs can also help.

3. No caffeine in the afternoon or evening. That means no soda or chocolate. They should avoid spicy food and finish eating three hours before going to bed.

4. Do not use the computer, TV, or fight half an hour before going to sleep. Studies have shown that the body’s production of melatonin (which helps people sleep) is reduced by playing the computer or watching TV.

5. Offer a bedtime snack. Certain foods stimulate the release of sleep-promoting serotonin: a glass of milk, a slice of whole-wheat toast with cheese, half a peanut butter sandwich, and oatmeal with a banana.

6. Relaxing music is often helpful, so is taking a hot bath.

So let’s say you finally manage to get the kids to sleep. Now how do you help them sleep? Snoring is not just an adult problem. 12% of all children suffer from snoring, which greatly affects their ability to sleep well. A new study also shows that children who snore are more likely to fail in school than children who do not snore. Dr. Norman Friedman, a sleep disorder specialist at Children’s Hospital in Denver, said: “Research now shows that snoring can lead to behavioral problems and difficulty concentrating.”

My two children have nightmares. Are your visual and spatial children unable to shake their memories when they wake up from nightmares that seem so real? These nightmares usually occur during the deepest part of sleep, REM sleep, and the sleep your baby needs the most. You can try using a dream catcher and hanging it above the bed. Generations of dream catchers. Native American legends say that dream catchers filter the dreams of the sleeping person, capturing the good ones and channeling the bad dreams through the river hole. If this helps your kids fall into a deep enough sleep that their nightmares aren’t too difficult, they’ll have done the trick!

Of course, there are other sleep problems, such as sleepiness, sleepiness, bedwetting, and night terrors. According to the Children’s Sleep Information for Parents and Teachers website (www.sleepforkids.org), you should consult your child’s doctor if you experience any of the following:

· Newborns or infants who are excessively and frequently fussy

· A child with difficulty breathing or wheezing

· A child who snores, especially if the snoring is loud

· Abnormal waking at night

Difficulty falling or staying asleep, especially daytime sleepiness and/or behavioral problems

To learn more about your child’s sleep patterns, visit the National Sleep Foundation. Many nights of relaxation await!

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