The Science Of Song How And Why We Make Music Renaissance Science and the Song of an Extinct Sea Monster

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Renaissance Science and the Song of an Extinct Sea Monster

What does it mean that a strange, crude, extinct marine ammonite was able to send 20 million years of spatial evolutionary information to influence the design of modern seashell creations? To answer the question, it appears to have been designed to float vertically, suggesting an evolutionary process better understood in ancient Greek times than modern science. The Japanese Nipponite Mirabilis stone had a snake-like coiled shell from which emerged a small squid-like creature that slowly floated through the ancient seas to trap its food. Evidence that the ancient Greek life sciences may be correct makes Darwin’s theories of evolution obsolete.

In the 1980s, the leading Italian science journal Il Nuovo Cimento published papers written by mathematician Chris Illert of the Australian Center for Science and Arts, who was able to produce seashell simulations that were indistinguishable from color photographs of live seashells. By reducing the harmonic structure of his formula, a simulation of the creature’s ancestor was created. Lowering the formula with lower harmonics yielded a strange, compressed, pipe-like fossilized simulation.

A rough model of the seashell is described by the Smithsonian Institution as an accurate simulation of Nipponite Mirabilis. Illert was the first to show that an extinct ammonite was able to transmit design information across 20 million years of cosmic time to influence the design of living organisms. His optical discovery was reprinted in 1990 by the world’s largest technological research institute as an important discovery in 20th century literature.

Illert’s mathematics was associated with Renaissance geometry and caused considerable controversy at the time. Some scholars, such as George Cockburn, M.D. of the Queen’s College of London, argued that the logic of evolution belongs to the universal spatio-temporal logic of fractal geometry. This was not a popular idea, as general science was and still is subject to Einstein’s Laws of All Science. Although the infinite logic of fractal geometry is quite acceptable to modern science, it must destroy all life in the universe, a death sentence demanded by Einstein’s worldview. Dr. Cockburn of the Arts-Science Center is familiar with Chris Illert’s research and has devoted the rest of his life to connecting artistic creativity with the operation of universal fractal logic. Cockburn’s optical theories led to the modification of Leonardo’s theory of all knowledge, which successfully demonstrated that Darwin’s theory of life-science was based on false assumptions.

Leonardo da Vinci believed that the eye was the key to all knowledge, and Plato considered it a barbaric engineering, because such principles ignored the principles of optical engineering in his mind. Engineer Buckminster Fuller based his life energy synergistic discoveries on Plato’s study of ethical optics. Fuller’s work was based on fractal mathematical logic, consistent with Cockburn’s published medical research. Fullerene logic now supports the new fractal logic of the life-sciences, which was adopted by three 1996 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry.

Leonardo’s theory is modified because when the sperm comes into contact with the liquid crystal membrane of the ovum, there is no eye, and life begins due to the operation of liquid crystal fractal logic optics. The discovery linked human evolution to ancient prehistoric life forms, where fatty acids sometimes combined with minerals to form liquid crystal soaps, crystalline formations that exhibited distinct fractal activity related to human evolution when exposed to cosmic X-rays. turned into

The transmission of fractal evolutionary data from a small extinct sea creature across 20 million years of space-time reveals an aspect of fractal life-scientific intelligence far beyond Darwin’s theory of evolution. It goes far beyond the primitive technology of modern science, but now aligns with Platonic principles of spiritual engineering associated with the new life-scientific chemistry. The human sphenoid bone vibrates the life energy force of the seashell, which Nipponiti Mirabilis uses to propel forward the fractal logical evolution. Human vibration is related to the design of the seashell of the human cochlea, which is not intended to keep the animal upright in water, but to keep humans upright on land.

Dr. Richard Merrick of the University of Texas has studied and developed sufficiently the electromagnetic fractal logic of life that works within the mechanisms of the human creative brain. This activity can be considered to be determined by liquid crystal programming of the sphenoid. Dr. Merrick’s work is related to the fractal life-science worldview of Pythagoras, the “Musical Sphere,” which can be seen as a connection to the life force song sung by the Nipponite Mirabilis. We can now ask where the sphenoid wants to go in order to develop human survival technology. Every time the sphenoid changes its shape, something new emerges from the anthropomorphic fossil record. Using the knowledge of harmonic music sung by tiny sea monsters floating in ancient seas off the coast of Japan, we can imagine futuristic high technology connected to reality 20 million years into the future.

©Professor Robert Pope

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