The Terms That Indicate Tempo In Music Are Usually In Beats Per Minute and Beats Per Measure – The Two Important BPMs of Every Song!

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Beats Per Minute and Beats Per Measure – The Two Important BPMs of Every Song!

When should a male dancer start leading his partner in a figure six or figure eight leg routine once the swing music starts? The answer is that he should start lowering it at any time of the song; ie, count “3” on count “1” and count “5” or “7”. These “base beats” are the backbone or pulse of the sound! You don’t need to be a trained musician to understand the rhythm (or time) of a song, just listen to the music and choose a rhythm section (drums, bass, guitar or piano).

To determine the beats per minute (BPM) of sound pulses, these falling beats are counted for fifteen seconds and then multiplied by four. Very slow swing songs are around 70 BPM and very fast songs are over 200 BPM. For me, the swing songs I like to dance to the most have an average tempo of 125 BPM, which keeps my heart rate at an optimal level when working out. Note that these declines are different from the ups that occur on a “2” count, a “4” count, a “6” count, or an “8” count. St. Louis Imperial style East Coast swing, We begin to step on any of the downbeats of the music; However, this is not true for all dance styles. For example, in Cha-Cha, dancers start walking after an upbeat song in any music.

Beats per minute became a common term in popular music during the disco era, as it was useful for DJs; This is still important in dance music today, as both our dance patterns and the rhythm of our feet are determined by the rhythm of the music! The original or classic style of Imperial Swing, danced in “wheels,” is performed to slower tempo (130-185 BPM) music, primarily using one-step and two-step foot rhythms. Today’s modern style of Imperial Swing danced in the slot is a combination of East Coast Swing (135-175 BPM) and West Coast Swing (75-115 BPM). Dancers play this popular, “slot-bop” hybrid at a slower tempo (100-135 BPM) and primarily use a faster, triple-step foot rhythm. Remember that the terms are musical time (or tempo) and foot tempo (or step), not the other way around!

Different musical styles have “time signatures” that tell dancers how many measures there are and which notes represent which beat. Swing music uses 4/4 time; i.e., with a time signature of 4 beats (4/4) and a quarter beat (4/4). For example, in your six-count, triplet foot exercise, on counts 1 and 2, “1” is the eighth note (or half beat) and “and 1” is the eighth note (or half beat). hit). Together they add a quarter or 1 beat; and the number “2” is a quarter or 1 beat. In numbers 3 and 4, “3” is an eighth note (or half beat) and “and 3” is an eighth note (or half beat). Together they add a quarter or 1 beat; and the number “4” is a quarter or 1 beat. These 2 beats bring a total of 4 beats, or one measure.

Finally, on intervals 5 – 6, the number “5” is a quarter note (or 1 beat) and the number “6” is a quarter note (or 1 beat). These final two 2s bring a total of six beats, or one half measure. Summarizing this number of feet, the dancers take eight steps to six beats of the music. Beats 1 and 3 are downbeats (or base beats) and beats 2 and 4 are upbeats. In East Coast Swing, the accent* is on beats 1 and 3 (number); However, in the West Coast Swing, the accent is on the 2nd and 4th beats. Good dancers tell the music what to do with their feet. If they start their foot on the down beat of a song and finish on the sixth (or eighth) beat, they are dancing in time to the music and finishing their step when they should. California Swing Hall of Fame award winner and renowned swing instructor Skippy Blair tells his students: “Don’t tell me how long to hold the kick, I can put my foot down!

*Note: Skippy Blair: “Elements and Timing” defines an accent as a solid sound, or moving to a particular note or number.

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