The Word Tempo Refers To The Pace Of The Music Songwriting – When and How to Speed Up (Or Slow Down) Your Song’s Melody

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Songwriting – When and How to Speed Up (Or Slow Down) Your Song’s Melody

Sometimes it’s good to have your melody and lyrics sped up within the song. Maybe you want to do this to inject some contrast into your song, or your lyrics have ideas of speed and tempo, and you want to incorporate prosody into your work, so incorporate your music to match your lyrics. . In any case, what I’m going to show you here is an easy way to make your melody sound faster without changing your tempo at all.

The main thing to keep in mind when practicing what I’m about to show you is that some beats in the scale are stronger than others. For example, in 4/4 time, the first and third beats of a measure tend to be the strongest, and the second tends to stand out and stand out, respectively. is a strong stroke of measure. The rest of the strokes act as unstressed strokes.

So what does this have to do with speeding up your tune? It’s simple. The more words and syllables you cram between the tense beats of the scale, the faster your melody will sound.

Gwen Stefani’s song “The Sweet Escape” has a great example of this. The song begins with the following two lines.


If I can escape, let me tell you first

I have to apologize for treating you so badly

Let’s examine how these lyrics fit into the metrical scale. The first and third syllables of the scale are written in bold. Remember that these are strong periods of measure. So our lyrics will now look like this:


If I can –CAPEI WILL BE but first ALLCome on LANGUAGE

I have to –PAUL– for ACTsmell & TREATMENT– This is you ROAD

In the lyrics above, the word “departure” occurs on the first beat of the “-cape” measure, and the word “wuld” occurs on the third beat of the measure. The remaining words in bold strike the first and third beats as the melody progresses.

At this point in the song, a fairly standard tempo is established, depending on how many syllables are crammed between the first and third strong beats. If you look at the syllables in bold above, you’ll notice that they range from one to three syllables. between a strong beat in every measure. For example, the three-syllable phrase “but the first” appears in the first line between the words “will” and “all” (those two words fall on the strong third and first beats).

If you listen to the beginning of the song, you will notice that after the first two lines, the next lines sound very fast. The lyrics to these lines are:


Because I acted like sour milk fell on the floor

It’s your fault for not closing the fridge

Maybe this is the reason for my cold behavior?

No rhythm or anything changes to create this speed. Instead, more syllables are crammed between the strong beats of the measure. Check it out. Once again, I’ll emphasize the words that hit the first and third syllables.


Because I was ACT– like sour milk FALLEN on the floor

It’s yours WRONG you didn’t close againFRIG– editor

Maybe YES the reason I was ACT– Is it that cold?

When we write these lyrics in bold, we can see that in most cases there are five syllables between each strong beat. If you recall the first two lines, there was only one, two, or three syllables between each hard hit. Five innings is a lot more than three when it comes to what you can do between hard hits. And it’s definitely more than one. As a result, we get a piece of music that sounds much faster than what we’ve heard before.

The first two lines set the standard. In comparison, the next group of lines sounded faster because they were done more than the first two lines.

You can also use this concept to slow down a tune in the same way. The only difference will be you start There are lots of syllables between each beat, and then it goes lower than what it started with. This will slow down the last set of lines.

For lyrical purposes, ideas like these often work best when paired with your lyrics. If you’ve been singing about speed, hyper speed, or anything else, speeding up your tunes like this is a great step. Conversely, if you were singing about something slowing down or being slowed down, it would make sense to start with a fast melody and then slow it down when you get to the part about the slow moving thing. Have fun with this idea and use it wherever your music works best.

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