What Am I Why Don T We Piano Sheet Music Making the Move To Jazz Performance – Should You Pursue It?

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Making the Move To Jazz Performance – Should You Pursue It?

Often a rock musician is suddenly inspired to learn to play jazz. This is an ambitious pursuit and should be approached with caution. This article will outline the challenges of learning jazz and the commitment required to succeed. This will provide a concise list of jazz artists that all music students should study, listen to, and absorb in their understanding.

I will divide this topic into two parts: drums and all other instruments. First we’ll talk about drums. If you’re a drummer, understand that jazz is the most rhythmic and ambitious music in the regular musical cycle. The drum kit (or “snare” as it is sometimes called in jazz) comes into full use. Jazz drummers prefer smaller setups and use them to their fullest rather than occasionally hitting 38 different percussive objects. Although jazz sounds like “dark and mysterious” music, the big songs are tuned much higher than the music found in a typical rock set.

Be prepared to spend hours learning limb independence. “Swing” rhythms dominate the Common Practice era of jazz (roughly 1928-1968). No jazz drummer can be taken seriously without a knack for swinging rhythms. Get in the habit of being a master timekeeper with your hatted feet. Get ready for complex, triad-centered rhythmic imagery. You can benefit greatly from enlisting the help of a jazz drummer who knows what they are doing. The student-teacher relationship is important in jazz. Information and skills are often transmitted directly and in person.

Develop your jazz knowledge and taste by listening to the best artists in the industry. Various fluff and gimmicks have come and gone. The creators of the true taste of jazz live and are still being studied. There have been many great jazz drummers throughout history. I’ll give you a short and must-know list: Buddy Rich, Roy Haynes, Jack DeJohnette, Max Roach, Elvin Jones.

We now focus on melodic/harmonic oriented instruments such as piano, guitar, saxophone, bass and trumpet. If you’re new to jazz, you may not be familiar with the extremes of harmonics. If you can’t pronounce the notes of a C7 chord or know that Gminor7 is the “two” chord in the key of F, you have a lot of work to do. Get ready to learn chords like “F sharp minor 7-flat-five-flat-nene” or “A flat 7 sharp 11”. Even if your instrument is monophonic, you need to know what’s going on in terms of harmony. Many serious wind and brass players will learn piano to develop their harmonic understanding. Serious jazz artists don’t just “wing it”. The harmonic subsurface of music is often constantly changing. In jazz, you don’t just play solos “on key”. You play expressions with every moment fully aware of the harmonic structure that supports the music in that moment. Studying with a skilled jazz musician/educator will greatly benefit you.

Jazz has been around for a century. Over time, it became possible to study a collection of excellent jazz artists. No matter what instrument you play (trumpet, piano, guitar, saxophone bass, etc.), below is a list of the best jazz music. Each of the following artists should be on your radar screen. Your elementary education should include the following acoustic artists: John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Keith Jarrett, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Bill Evans, Bud Powell, Charlie Parker, Herbie Hancock, Art . Tatum, Frank Sinatra, Charles Mingus, Ron Carter, Earl Hines, Count Basie. As your interests and circumstances guide you, expand your understanding with the following electro artists: Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, Jaco Pastorius, Les Paul, Wes Montgomery, Miles Davis, Jimmy Smith, Joey DeFrancesco, Pat Metheny (note: some artists are listed will). two categories). The artists featured in the collection above are all serious and accomplished jazz musicians who are respected by the jazz-listening and performing public.

Jazz is not a simple music that can be learned in a week. The above will help you understand the seriousness of the work and point you in the direction of serious artists who have excelled in this field. Good luck and give yourself the proper amount of time, discipline, and learning resources to succeed in this challenging and ambitious art form. Even if you don’t pursue jazz to the point of mastery, you’ll benefit from getting into this ambitious and uniquely American music form.

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