What Does Your Taste In Music Say About Your Personality The Secret World of the Unborn Child

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The Secret World of the Unborn Child

Childhood experiences are not the only factors that determine our destiny. A child’s life does not begin at birth. We can’t see a baby before it’s born (except with an ultrasound machine), but that doesn’t mean it’s out of touch with the outside world. Although the unborn child lives in a world of his own, he is still deeply affected by everything that happens around him, especially the thoughts, feelings and actions of his parents. Research shows that a fetus is capable of living an active emotional life as early as the sixth month, if not earlier. In the womb, he can feel, even see, hear, taste, feel and learn. How he feels while in the womb depends mostly on how he perceives the messages he receives from the mother, but also from the father and the environment.

Bonding begins before birth

An anxious mother who constantly worries about making mistakes or suffers from other forms of emotional imbalance can leave deep scars on the personality of the developing fetus. Similarly, a confident and confident mother gives him a deep sense of contentment and security. Traces of these or similar initial emotions shape a person’s attitudes and expectations, and eventually create traits that make him shy, anxious, aggressive, self-confident, optimistic, and happy. Contrary to popular belief, recent research has shown that a father’s attitude toward his wife and unborn child plays the most important role in determining pregnancy success. There is strong evidence that a father who nurtures his child in the womb makes a big emotional difference to his child’s well-being. A newborn can recognize and respond emotionally to his father’s voice within the first hour or two after birth, if he has been talking to the baby during pregnancy. For example, the soothing and familiar tone of his voice can stop a baby from crying, which makes him feel protected and safe.

Maternal diet is known to affect fetal growth. It has been proven that smoking and drinking alcohol cause irreparable damage to the developing fetus. Several rigorous experiments have shown that the thoughts, feelings, and emotions of parents (especially mothers) have a greater impact on the unborn child.

There are many guesses as to exactly when an unborn baby begins to recognize and respond to these external stimuli, but it seems secondary. Most importantly, human life begins in the womb and is shaped by all the experiences during pregnancy (the nine months of the womb). Research has shown that whenever the mother thinks about smoking, the heart rate of the unborn child increases. Without lighting a cigarette or smoking, the fetus, in the mother’s mind, anticipates the terrible drop in oxygen in her and the mother’s blood, creating a momentary rush of adrenaline. This stress response made his heart beat faster. A mother’s desire to smoke can be related to her inner uncertainty, nervousness and fear. As she converts these emotions into corresponding chemical compounds in her brain, the fetus also has an emotional response. This condition eventually leaves the unborn child with deep nervousness and anxiety later in life.

Rhythm of happiness

Maternal anxiety has been repeatedly proven to cause excessive fetal activity. Researchers have been able to show that the most active fetus will eventually become the most anxious child. They become unusually shy and protect themselves from teachers, school friends, friendships, and social interactions. If the emotional imbalances in early pregnancy are not addressed, teenagers are likely to remain repressed and shy into their thirties and into old age.

The rhythm and tone of the mother’s voice affects the unborn child. The fetus moves its body rhythm to match the unique rhythm of its mother’s speech. Also responds to sounds and tones from sources other than mother. Unborn babies can relax when they listen to soothing music like Vivaldi. Beethoven, on the other hand, kicks and moves them more, and there is a lot of screaming parents. Pregnant musicians have even “taught” their fetuses complex pieces of music. From a certain age, children are able to memorize music that they have never heard before except in the womb. Other children were found to repeat words and phrases that their mothers used only when they were pregnant. One child grew up speaking a foreign language that his mother had used while pregnant while working in a foreign country, but stopped using after birth.

The mother’s heartbeat is one of the most powerful tools for the joy of the growing fetus and its harmony with the outside world. The regular rhythm of his heartbeat reassures her that everything is fine. He can “read” changes in the mother’s mood by the rhythm of the heart. During pregnancy, the fetus feels the mother’s heartbeat as its main source of life, security and love. The emotional value of heartbeats was confirmed by a study that used tape recordings of the heartbeats of people playing in a nursery full of newborns. Babies who were exposed to heartbeat sounds ate more, gained weight, slept more, breathed better, cried less, and got sick less, compared to babies who missed the heartbeat sounds, researchers were surprised. Of course, under natural conditions, a baby is never separated from its mother after birth, so it will continue to feel its heartbeat.

“Cot death” occurs only in babies who are separated from their mothers after birth (another major risk factor is environmental tobacco smoke). Such babies feel abandoned by their mothers and cannot continue their vital functions without feeling or hearing the heartbeat. Most babies survive this incredible measure of separation from their mother, but are left with emotional scars later in life, including low self-esteem, weakness, and anxiety. In contrast, a baby who spends most of his time with his mother feels wanted and loved from the first moments of his life. As they get older, they have less reason to be insecure. Their personality will be friendly, confident, optimistic and extroverted.

A mixed message

The fetus can be strongly affected by stressful events in the mother’s life. As a result, stress hormones are released, causing the fetus to have the same emotional response as the mother. However, if she loves the baby unconditionally and believes that nothing else is as important to her as the growing child, the child will be safe and protected. A large study of 2,000 pregnant women in Germany found that children born to mothers who looked forward to having a baby were mentally and physically healthier both at birth and later than those born to mothers who did not want to have children. Another study conducted at the University of Salzburg in Austria found even more surprising results. Psychological analysis has shown that mothers who consciously or unconsciously want their unborn child have the easiest pregnancy, the most uncomplicated birth, and the healthiest children physically and emotionally. The group of mothers with negative attitudes toward their unborn child had the most serious health complications during pregnancy, giving birth to premature, low birth weight, and emotionally disturbed infants.

Many pregnant women give different messages to their babies. They often want to have children but don’t want to give up their careers. These unborn children are often apathetic and passive after birth. The second most important factor in determining infant outcomes is a woman’s relationship with her husband or partner. A recent study of more than 1,300 children and their families found that women locked in strong marriages had a 237 percent higher risk of having children with psychological or physical abnormalities. Children who feel love in the womb have every reason to trust and love when they live in the outside world. They generally have deep bonds with their parents and have little or no tendency to bond or connect with troubled people throughout their lives.

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